Sekou Sundiata, “Shout Out”

I normally don’t like this type of Black rap poetry, but this poem is just out of this world. It’s by a Black activist, poet, musician, and playwright named Sekou Sundiata (an adopted African name). This is from an album called The Blue Oneness of Dreams from 1997. This album won a Grammy award that year.

This is some incredible stuff. Some Blacks can write superb poetry, some of the finest poetry of all.

I get hammered when I say this, but this is an example of what I call “the Black genius.” Now that’s not to say that there are Blacks geniuses who can partake of the other genius styles, but I don’t think they’re as common as this type. It is in this style of genius that the Black man and the Black brain for that matter, truly shines bright as day. I suppose other races can display this genius style, but you sure don’t see it very often.

I can’t help thinking that Black minds or Black brains are different or at least tend to be different on average, and pure Black geniuses often look different from pure White geniuses, who tend more towards the airy philosophical world of ideas. This rapid-fire rapping type poetry, commentary, or even rap music can be found as a conversational style by Cornel West, Earl Ofari Hutchinson, Micheal Eric Dyson.

Listen to these Black geniuses (West is the best, but Dyson is also very good, and I’ve always had a soft spot for Hutchinson) and you will see that they all talk something like the Sundiata is in this video. It’s a very fast verbal brain at work, almost spewing out words so fast you can barely keep track of them.

Blacks do score higher than any other race in verbal memory and Africa never had writing. All they had was this oral tradition. Who knows, maybe they even selected for it? Is it beyond the realm of possibility. I really love this Black genius type with the rapid fire super-genius brain rattling off the perfect words in the perfect rhythm often with the perfect musical pitch to the spoken word.

Some White men can do this too, especially comedians. I am thinking in particular of Lenny Bruce, a Jewish comedian with an almost “Black” stage style and even Andy Kaufman at his best.

I keep hearing this poem on my radio station and I keep wondering who this is. Tonight I memorized a few lines and put them in Google and wa-la! Ladies and gentlemen, we have an answer!

I’m thinking right now that if there’s a heaven, there’s musical poems like this being played up there.

This poem is just too perfect!

Here’s to the best words
In the right place
At the perfect time to the human mind
Blown-up and refined.
To long conversations and the
Philosophical ramifications of a beautiful day.
To the twelve-steppers
At the thirteenth step
May they never forget
The first step.
To the increase, to the decrease
To the do to the do
To the did to the did
To the do to the did
To the done done
To the lonely.
To the brokenhearted.
To the new, blue haiku.
Here’s to all or nothing at all.
Here’s to the sick, and the shut-in.
Here’s to the was you been to the is you in
To what’s deep and deep to what’s down and down
To the lost, and the blind, and the almost found.

To the crazy
The lazy
The bored
The ignored
The beginners
The sinners
The losers
The winners.
To the smooth
And the cool
And even to the fools.
Here’s to your ex-best-friend.
To the rule-benders and the repeat offenders.
To the lovers and the troublers
The engaging
The enraging
To the healers and the feelers
And the fixers and the tricksters
To a star falling from a dream.
To a dream, when you know what it means.
To the bottom
To the root
To the base, uh, boom!
To the drum
To the was you been to the is you in
To what’s deep and deep to what’s down and down
To the lost, and the blind, and the almost found.

Here’s to somebody within the sound of your voice this morning.
Here’s to somebody who can’t be within the sound of your voice tonight.
To a low-cholesterol pig sandwich smothered in swine without the pork.
To a light buzz in your head
And a soundtrack in your mind
Going on and on and on and on and on like a good time.
Here’s to promises that break by themselves
Here’s to the breaks with great promise.
To people who don’t wait in the car when you tell them to wait in the car.
Here’s to what you forgot and who you forgot.
Here’s to the unforgettable.
To the was you been to the is you in
To what’s deep and deep to what’s down and down
To the lost, and the blind, and the almost found.

Here’s to the hip-hoppers
The don’t stoppers
Heads nodding in the digital glow
Of their beloved studios.
To the incredible indelible impressions made by the gaze as you gaze in the faces of strangers.
To yourself you ask: Could this be God? Straight up!
Or is it a mask?
Here’s to the tribe of the hyper-cyber
Trippin’ at the virtual-most outpost at the edge on the tip
Believin’ that what they hear is the mothership
Drawing near.
To the was you been to the is you in
To what’s deep and deep to what’s down and down
To the lost, and the blind, and the almost found.

Nosferatu, “The Night Is Young”

Nosferatu again. I can’t get enough of these guys. Off of The Best of Nosferatu, Volume 1, The Hades Years from 2001. Only 18 years ago!  They still made good music in the 21st Century! Looks like it never appeared on any of the studio albums, but they added it to the Best of album.

Nice evil lyrics there…”The Devil lays down your salvation.” Haha. Oh, you bad, bad boys. Mommy’s going to have to give you a spanking!

We move in silhouette
Loved in candlelight
Can’t you feel the night is young
Come dance with the ghost
Step in through my door
Don’t you know the night is young
In the city lights
A pale reflection’s calling
How we love the night so young

Hanging from horizons eyes
See the faces crystalline
Trace your foot steps, follow through
Down on the ground and kiss those black lips
Back upon you, waiting on
Sound of heartbeats, breathing’s drawn
Tasting your temptation
My dark embraces revelation

We move in silhouette
Loved in candlelight
Can’t you feel the night is young
Come dance with the ghost
Step in through my door
Don’t you know the night is young
In the city lights
A pale reflection’s calling
How we love the night so young

We move in silhouette
Loved in candlelight
Can’t you feel the night is young
Come dance with the ghost
Step in through my door
Don’t you know the night is young
In the city lights
A pale reflection’s calling
How we love the night so young

Up above the skyline high time
Look across the evening’s cries
So many empty hearts just wasting
Time they don’t have left to kill
The moonlight guides the darkness near
To a place where desire waits
In cold anticipation
The Devil lays down your salvation

We move in silhouette
Loved in candlelight
Can’t you feel the night is young
Come dance with the ghost
Step in through my door
Don’t you know the night is young
In the city lights
A pale reflection’s calling
How we love the night so young

Nosferatu, “Torturous”

I am really starting to like these guys. I am listening to a lot of Gothic Rock last couple of days, but this band always seems to stand out for some reason. I love those heavy jangling guitars. They sound a lot like Joy Division, but so did that Xmal Deutschland band I posted earlier. Joy Division really laid the trail for this kind of music. Ian Curtis, RIP.

Listen to the drums. That’s what really makes this song. Rat Scabies (lol) formerly of The Damned (also a gothic rock but also a punk rock band) is on drums here. I played on a number of their later songs.

That guitar is killer too though, face it. So’s the damned piano.

This is also off of Lord of the Flies, 1998. Sounds like they might have peaked around then.

X-Mal Deutschland, “Incubus Succubus (Live)”

Here’s that song I posted yesterday again. This time its live. The band was German, they were actually an all-girl band, believe it or not, and they even sung in German!

This song is said to be a Gothic Rock classic, and some think this is the greatest Gothic Rock song of all time. I can’t believe I am just hearing this song for the first time 37 years after it came out. And I was into the Goth scene at the time, too.

I just discovered listening to this music that I am not sure if it matters what language great music is sung in. For instance, this song  sounds awesome in German! I haven’t the faintest idea what they are singing about, but it doesn’t even matter! You can’t make out the lyrics on a lot of music like this anyway.

I had an excellent post-punk song by a French band I never heard of on tape long ago. I loved that song even though I didn’t understand a word of what they were saying.

This is where having an intuitive mind versus a logical mind comes in handy.

A logical mind would get furious because it couldn’t understand the words.

The intuitive or holistic mind doesn’t care because it’s looking for the Gestalt (great German word there), the whole picture, the experience in totality, the overall vibe, the case where the sum is great than the whole of its parts, the “I can’t put my finger on it but I know it when I see it” feeling, the “I feel it in my gut or body” feeling.

The intuitive (female or feminine) mind is holistic. It looks at the forest and misses the individual trees.

The logical (male or masculine) mind sees the individual trees but can’t make out the whole forest or the picture in totality, hence where we get our phrase, “Can’t see the forest for the trees.”

Es tanzen die narren
Ein herz aus eisen
Über den wolken
Unter der erde

Incubus succubus
Succubus incubus
Incubus succubus
Succubus incubus
Incubus succubus

Feuer, feuer, ohhh!
Feuer, feuer, ohhh!
Feuer, feuer, ohhh!
Feuer, feuer, ohhh!

Romanze der nüchte und glut
Leben und tod sonne, mond
Kalt und heiß
Schwarz und rot

Kürper und geist
Liebe und chaos
Erweckt neues leben
Für meine kräfte

Ooooh

Incubus succubus
Succubus incubus

Ganz tief unten, wo es kein licht mehr gibt
Dümonen, am himmel ist kein platz für uns!
Am himmel ist kein platz für uns!

Incubus succubus
Succubus incubus
Incubus succubus
Succubus incubus

Vom himmel fiel ein morgenstern
Ein neuer gott
Für unsere mächte

Incubus succubus
Succubus incubus

Ganz tief unten, wo es kein licht mehr gibt
Hexensabbat regiert die nacht
Hexensabbat regiert die energie der nacht
Hexensabbat
Regiert die energie der nacht
Die energie der nacht
Die energie der nacht

Incubus succubus
Succubus incubus
Incubus succubus
Succubus incubus

Nosferatu, “Witching Hour”

Really nice. Another perfect Halloween song.

I am not sure if I ever even heard of these guys.  British Gothic Rock band.

At first I thought this was more 80’s Gothic Rock, but this song is from 1998! That’s only 21 years ago. What do you know? They actually kept making good music into the 1990’s. Apparently this is called Second Wave Gothic Rock, the earlier stuff being the groups I posted earlier such as 45 Grave, Xmal Deutchland, etc. I had no idea that they had first and second waves of Gothic Rock!

I am really starting to like these morbid Gothic Rock stuff. Perfect for a sick mind like mine.

Nosferatu, “Witching Hour”, off Lord of the Flies (1998)

Overland, you could take these lifeless hands in yours
Breathe into me things I gave up praying for.
Tired of shadow play through a darker gaze,
Will you take what I want you to?
Will you forsake things you never should?
It’s time, time to set the world alight.

Set your spirit free
Come across the sky to me
Give in to insanity
The witching hour
Wait for me behind the door
I’ll throw your body to the floor
We will be apart no more
The witching hour

Can you feel the fire that’s burning me inside?
As your touch darkens your betraying smile
Cast unrest aside, it’s time to come alive
I don’t think I need to tell you
Such a mirrored ride

Set your spirit free
Come across the sky to me
Give in to insanity
The witching hour
Wait for me behind the door
I’ll throw your body to the floor
We will be apart no more
The witching hour

45 Grave, “Evil”

Perfect song for Halloween.

Think it came out in 1982. Early LA punk rock. This is Horror Punk, Deathrock, and Gothic Rock. These folks fashioned themselves as some sort of devil worshipping maniacs. Lead singer was a woman named Dinah Cancer. Paul Cutler was the main guy in the band. I saw them twice, once in Long Beach and a year later in LA.

I went to see this gothic rock band and 45 Grave was up first. I was dating the female lead singer, and she’s slightly famous. I was also dating her best friend at the same time.

I had met them both at the same time at a rock show at the Rainbow. They both had their hands all over me as soon as they met me, total strangers. They seemed drunk. The lead singer said, “You smell like popcorn.” She had this insane look on her face. She often had an insane look on her face. That was one of my favorite things about her.

Anyway I met Paul Cutler after the show backstage. He was extremely friendly and immediately took a strong liking to me. Maybe he thought I was smart. This guy had been living in the city way too long. He was going on about some dream he had of a city of the future with trams and high speed trains going at three or four different levels all at once. The whole city was mechanized and lit up. Blade Runner style. He’d probably never been on a hike in his life.

Xmal Deutschland, “Incubus Succubus”

Another perfect song for Halloween! Band is called Xmal Deutschland. From 1982, almost 40 years ago. The music is called Gothic Rock. Bauhaus, the Cure, the aforementioned 45 Grave, Christian Death, Joy Division, etc.

Actually this sounds more like Christian Death than anything else. I saw them once at the Anticlub in 1985. They were fantastic. That was right before Rozz left when they were at their peak. Perfect wall of sound, as good as Phil Spector but dark as Hell. Dark as life, that is.

I set a record that night. I picked up a woman within three minutes of walking in the door! Anyone ever done that? Walk right into a party, a nightclub, Hell anywhere, and pick up a perfect stranger in only a short period of time. If you can do that, my hat’s off to you. You’re the man.

Jazz As Pure American and Pure Black Music

I always wondered why is Jazz so popular among people living in former Soviet bloc countries.

On the other hand, I met many Brits (and Americans) who not only hate Jazz but any of its paraphernalia. You just have to mention Jazz and the conversation will end right there. Maybe it’s old-fashioned today to be swinging to Jazz beats? But then there’s Latin Jazz which is phenomenal.

Maybe my experiences were subjective. But, I did encounter so many Jazz-haters. I couldn’t believe my ears: “how can anyone hate such a soulful, melodious music.”

I love Jazz because it has a hint of romance in every beat. Jazz is the rhythm of the most beautiful life.

Most of us rockers don’t hate jazz. At worst we find it rather boring. We hate jazz fans or jazzholes as we call them! See below.

Jazz is very nice music and it is often also very good music. The great Black jazz musicians like Coltrane and Miles Davis were absolutely out of this world. I mean they were in another category altogether – sort of on a higher plane.

I don’t like “jazzholes.” A lot of jazz fans are like that. They are anti-hipsters who hate rock and roll and think it is stupid and lowbrow, except that it’s not. They think they are intellectual and sophisticated, often wear suits even as young men, despise hipsters, refuse to smoke pot or do any drugs at all and instead prefer to drink alcohol, preferably the hard stuff in mixed drugs.

I always considered them to be a bunch of squares and never liked them very much. Jazz versus rock got caught up in the anti-hippie culture wars on the 1960’s-1080’s which at its mildest form simply hated rock music and pot and at its worst hated long hair and the whole nine yards.

Jazz isn’t British music. British music is rock and roll!

Jazz came out of the US and it all came from Black people. The roots were all the way back to the 20’s and it was long associated with a drug-using, mostly Black underground in big US cities like New York where the scene was big Harlem.

I have no idea why jazz is so popular in the former Soviet bloc.

The Marriage of Drug, Black, and Jazz Cultures in the Earlier Days of Jazz Music

The jazz underground has always been associated with Black people and drugs even from its early days in the 1920’s.

The drug back then was mostly marijuana which was widely demonized back then because it was mostly used by Blacks and Hispanics. Whites who used it were more or less White niggers or wiggers so to speak.

The Pot Makes You Violent Bullshit

My Mom has believed this garbage her whole life. She keeps bringing it up. She got infected with this propaganda way back as a girl. This shows how strong propaganda is and how it has the potential to override all reason.

This is where the myth the crazed psychotic violent pot crazed murdering maniac comes from – the fact that most pot users were either city Blacks or low-skilled Mexican workers. These people were considered to be violent types – and they are more violent than Whites. They also used pot, so it was assumed that the pot and violence went together except that it didn’t and if anything it probably calmed them down.

There were also a few notorious cases in which unstable pot smokers went wild and committed some savage murders. The relationship of pot with these cases is unknown but back then, few people smoked pot, but one thing was for sure – almost all criminals, even White criminals, smoked pot. In fact it was seen as a drug of criminals which is why a lot of people didn’t want to use it.

The completely serious movie (now a so bad it’s great movie) Reefer Madness is emblematic of the anti-pot propaganda of the time.

A man named Henry J. Anslinger headed the Drug Enforcement Agency back then, and he had some sort of a hard-on for pot for some crazy reason. He led the anti-pot campaign in the US for many years starting  in the 1930’s. He was more of a brainwashed (and racist) fool than anything else, but he damaged the lives of a lot of innocent pot smokers.

Of course anyone who has smoked pot knows that it calms you down. I knew Jack Herrer, a famous post activist.

He told me that when he was in jail and prison, prisoners who smoked pot always calmed down a lot and became less aggressive and violent. He said some of the wardens even turned a blind eye to pot use for his reason. In fact, the passivity that this drug causes is one of its biggest problems, as people get lost in their bong hits and become apathetic as the world passes them by.

This amotivational syndrome is mostly an issue for teenagers and young adults and it is quite common among young potheads. However, I have hardly ever met an adult past age 23 who had amotivational syndrome, as most even very heavy pot-smokers develop the work ethic needed to survive in our society by that age.

Teenagers and young adults are notoriously apathetic and poorly motivated as it is, since they have not yet been beaten over the head with the Reality Stick of Life. Encapsulate such a young person in a perennial cloud of pot smoke, and it just makes the laziness and lack of guidance, direction, and purpose typical of this age group all the worse.

Anyway, the jazz scene lingered in mostly Black and rather sleazy nightclubs in ghettos where nevertheless a lot of lowlife White types who lived my sort of lifestyle liked to go to slum it up on weekends. White men have been slumming it up forever. There is a cool element to it as long as you do not get too taken in by it.

Ghetto Drugs and Non-Ghetto Drugs

Cocaine and heroin were also pretty widely widely used in this scene – cocaine all the way back to the 1920’s, when we were already getting warnings about the insidious nature of this drug. Heroin was always around too, as it’s always been in the ghettos. It got more popular in the 1950’s and many great Black jazz musicians become junkies.

Psychedelics were never popular, as not only were they not around then, but also people in the ghettos and barrios of big cities have never been big psychedelic fans.

Psychedelics actually do expand your awareness and exaggerate whatever environment you are in. This is great for self-exploration if you have a fairly cozy life, but if your life blows for any reason, you might just have a bad trip.

I kept a hit of strong LSD in my refrigerator for two years until I finally felt that my head was perfectly clear and sane enough to take the stuff. The importance of what is called set and setting is extremely important for drugs like this.  Psychedelics are not escapist drugs – they are the opposite.

As Blacks and Hispanics in city ghettos and barrios are usually living anywhere from a hardscrabble to nightmarish existence, the last they want to is to take a drug that makes that very existence about 10 times as powerful as it is.

On the other hand, PCP  was popular in the Black and Hispanic communities, but it is not a psychedelic per se, as it is more of an anesthetic – it was originally an animal tranquilizer, and people used to refer to it as “elephant tranquilizer,” which was exactly what it was used for.

Yes, that stuff was actually used to literally knock out massive elephants. Now think about a drug that is strong enough to put an elephant on its ass and try to imagine what it will do  to a comparatively puny human.

The PCP experience can be profoundly weird, but I suppose it is also a form of escapism, as when you use PCP  you are basically traveling to another  planet right here on Earth. Going all the way to another planet while never leaving your own is about as powerful as escapism gets, I would say.

Sonny Landreth, “Taylor’s Rock”

Sonny Landreth, Taylor’s Rock from Hound Dog Taylor: A Tribute, 1997, on Alligator Records, featuring cover versions of Taylor’s songs by Luther Allison, Elvin Bishop, Cub Koda (with Taylor’s band, the HouseRockers), Gov’t Mule, Sonny Landreth, and others.

It’s hard to believe that music can get any better than this. I mean seriously. How is that even possible?

When I heard this I was wondering what it sounded like. The Allman Brothers and Lynyrd Skinyrd came to mind. The music also has a Southern sound to it, and Landreth was from New Orleans. His music is called something like Bayou Blues Rock.

I thought more and it reminded me also of ZZ Top, a legendary band from my high school days. ZZ Top also played blues rock with a Southern tinge to it. It’s excellent music.

This is real blues, in this case blues rock. Sonny Landreth was a legendary blues rock guitarist who played slide guitar that I had never heard of before.

He played with Eric Clapton and Johnny Winter,  and his music sounds like both of theirs. After all, both of them play the slide guitar, and so did the late Duane Allman of the Allman Brothers, dead too soon at 24. Slide guitar is a difficult way to play guitar using a metal slide as the fret instead of your fingers. It produces a very nice sound, and sometimes I think it is better than the sound of an ordinary guitar.

Now if any of you out here hate Black people, well, whatever. That’s for you and Black folks to sort out. It’s not my problem. I’m not here to be a moralfag. I’m not your Mom, your pastor, or the Thought Police. That’s a moral problem, between you and your God if you still even have one.

But if you love rock and roll, could you please leave the great Black blues musicians out of it? It’s the least you can do. They birthed your favorite music after all. Rock and roll came from the blues, and the blues is Black music, created by American Blacks.

A later form of it in the late 1940’s and early 1950’s went into rhythm and blues, a direct precursor to rock and roll. At one time I had a number of those old pre-rock albums from that period. Most of the performers were Black. The vinyl was very hard to find, and many were actually 78 rpm records. Ever heard of those?

That’s some rockin’ stuff, a very special kind of music. If you get a chance you might want to check that stuff out and pay homage to the Black parents of your favorite music.

Dave Loggins, “Please Come to Boston”

Please come to Boston for the springtime
I’m stayin’ here with some friends
And they’ve got lots of room
You can sell your paintings on the sidewalk
And by a cafe where I hope to be workin’ soon

Please come to Boston
She said, “No, would you come home to me”
And she said, “Hey ramblin’ boy why don’t you settle down?
Boston ain’t your kind of town
There ain’t no gold, and there ain’t nobody like me
I’m the number one fan of the man from Tennessee”

Please come to Denver with the snowfall
Move up into the mountains so far that we can’t be found
And throw I love you echoes down the canyons
And then lie awake at night ’til they come back around

Please come to Denver
She said, “No, boy would you come home to me”
And she said, “Hey ramblin’ boy why don’t you settle down?
Denver ain’t your kind of town
There ain’t no gold and there ain’t nobody like me
I’m the number one fan of the man from Tennessee”

Now this drifter’s world goes round and round
And I doubt if it’s ever gonna stop
And of all the dreams I’ve lost and found
And all that I ain’t got
I need someone to cling to
Somebody I can sing to

Please come to L.A. to live forever
A California life alone is just too hard to fill
I live in a house that looks out over the ocean
And there’s some stars that fell from the sky
Livin’ up on the hill

Please come to L.A.
She said, “Boy you come home to me”
She said, “Hey ramblin’ boy why don’t you settle down?
L.A. can’t be your kind of town
There ain’t no gold and there ain’t nobody like me
Oh no, I’m the number one fan of the man from Tennessee
I’m the number one fan of the man from Tennessee”

This song was at the top of the charts in 1974, but I didn’t think I remembered it until I read the lyrics, and yes, I do remember this awesome tune now. At the time I simply didn’t know what it was called or who sang it. I have been listening to this great song on the radio off and on for 45  years now (it is still played, believe it or not), but I never knew what it was called or who did it.

I had actually never even heard of Dave Loggins until today. I was confusing him with Kenny Loggins of Loggins and Messina, another huge band in the 1970’s which recorded similar music. This is the only song he wrote that I have ever heard of. It’s also been covered by many others, but I am not familiar with any of those covers either.

This is also considered to be country music, but it is also something called soft rock that was very big back then. A lot of that soft rock was actually quite good and of course, women and girls always loved that music, so that was another reason to listen to it, if you know what I mean. Females love it when you love the music that they love, so even if you hate their music, it helps to at least fake it and pretend you love it because it’s such a great seduction technique.

Unfortunately I’m too honest to do that even though I’m a degenerate. Fortunately I do like a lot of the softer music that females like to listen to. Music like laughter loosens females up and gets them in romantic mood and they are always ecstatic if you like that softer music they like. Also music makes women horny, especially softer, romantic type music.

One of the great all-time tearjerkers. How could anyone not like this song? It’s  like not like butterflies or sunny days. I don’t get it.

Iggy Pop, “Pumpin’ for Jill”

When I’m asleep, you touch my feet
You let me know that I am no creep
Because I love you, you are for real
I’m gonna stay here – pumping for Jill

In the gas station where I work
Everyone treats me just like a jerk
Nobody offers me a tip
I’m gonna stay here – pumping Jill’s hips…

I met you out at the Mardi Gras
On a French Quarter sidewalk
When you kissed me, it was strong
I wonder if you’ll hear this song
La da da da da da, da da da da.

I love this song. It’s a ballad for losers.

The hero is a loser us who’s pumping gas at a gas station.

Everyone treats him like garbage, like a loser, a creep, a nothing, a zero. No one even offers him a tip. He’s so low he doesn’t even deserve their nickels.

But he has one thing those squares will probably never get – a hot babe named Jill. That’s only reason he works at all – for his chick. Sure, he’s a loser. Sure, he hasn’t a dime. Sure, everyone sneers at him. Why not? He hasn’t any money, and that’s all the worth of a man in these benighted states.

But when he goes home, he can still do one thing. He can pump Jill’s hip. He can fuck her into the night, just a bit harder each time he for every snub he got that day. As he bangs away into the dark, he knows that fucking a hot woman his haters will never have.

Who’s the loser now?

They met at the Mardi Gras. Beads and song in the air. Girls lifting up their tops. Entire streets are wasted and reeling with song and cheer. Babes howling on the balconies. Here he met Jill, in a whirl and flash. It was all a drunken She swooped towards him and landed a kiss on his sad face. A kiss full of power, the power of adoration.

Who’s the loser now?

Iggy Pop is one of my all-time favorite artists. This is off of Party, issued in 1981. I saw him at the Palladium in Hollywood in fall of that year. It was too much! Not much was happening on the stage. A band came out and set up their equipment. We were all wondering what was going to happen.

In one fluid movement, this maniac comes running full speed onto the stage, mike in hand, singing. The band in back starts in. He’s dressed in a Spiderman outfit, of all things! Who is it? Spiderman? WTH? I’m confused. I ask my friend, “Who is that? It’s him, right? It’s Iggy! He’s Spiderman!” My friend nods gravely. “Yep, it’s him, all right.”

It was a great show all the way. Lots of really hot young punker babes Iggy Pop chicks. Iggy Pop fans don’t care. They DGAF. They never did. Not from the very start with the Stooges, “Raw Power”,”Searching to Destroy”, “1969”, and especially “No Fun.”

An Iggy Pop chick yelling #metoo? That’s laughable. They’re punkers, not overgrown children. She might knee you in the balls if you get too rude, but she won’t wail like a baby and run to Mommy Cop like these women-children do nowadays.

Besides, Iggy Pop fans love to fuck, both sexes. And they hate authority. They hate cops. They’re basically anarchists. They’re the exact opposite of these prudish, priggish SJW’s who think you need to sign a contract in order to look at a woman or else they haul you off to jail.

“High Ridin’ Heroes,” by Tanya Tucker

Daylight or midnight
Red eyes and that old hat
Whiskey-bent and busted flat
She’s a credit to her flaws
She’s a bad risk, but a good friend
Small change and loose ends
She only regrets that she might’ve been
A little faster on the draw

Those old high ridin’ heroes
They’re anywhere the wind blows
She’s been to hell and Texas
And she knows how it feels
To be ridin’ that hot streak
And drunk on some back street
Falling off the wagon
And under the wheels

Time was when she was queen
Now the rodeo’s just this old girl’s dream
The highs are few and far between
The lows get the rest
These old hard times ain’t nothin’ new
Once you’ve done the best you can do
You just tip your hat to the wild and blue
And you ride off to the West

[Chorus]
Those old high ridin’ heroes
They’re anywhere the wind blows
She’s been to hell and Texas
And she knows how it feels
To be ridin’ that hot streak
And drunk on some back street
Falling off the wagon
And under the wheels

Those old high ridin’ heroes
They’re anywhere the wind blows
She’s been to hell and Texas
And she knows how it feels
To be ridin’ that hot streak
And drunk on some back street
Falling off the wagon
And under the wheels

Very, very nice.

This is some real country music. I mean the real thing. If you hate country music at all, there’s no way you will like this song.

The singer is Tanya Tucker. She’s a hardcore country artist. I never got into her music too much, but this song is out of this world. It actually sounds like the Flying Burrito Brothers! Even more than that, it sounds like Texan Country Rock. Think Doug Sahm. Or maybe, if you can imagine it, ZZ Top.

Although this album is very Texan and Tucker has a very country voice, she never lived in Texas. She was born in Arizona and her family then moved to Utah. Later they moved to Nevada. None of the people in those places have country accents last time I checked.

This song was written by country singer David Lynn Jones. It was actually written about a female rodeo rider that he knew, but Tucker reinterpreted it to weave it into her own life, quite nicely too.

Waylon Jennings guested on Jones’ album Hard Times on Easy Street. Waylon’s son, Shooter Jennings, via his wife Jessi Colter, is a Southern Rock singer-songwriter who has produced several excellent albums. He has also produced Marylin Manson and Guns n Roses bassist Duff McCagan. Shooter produced Tanya’s new album.

This song is off of Tucker’s latest album While I’m Livin’. Tucker is one of country music’s famous female outlaws, in part for her hard-partying ways. She inspired other female outlaw types like the Dixie Chicks.

Her first album was Delta Dawn in 1972, released when she was only a teenager. Although the cover by Helen Reddy is better known, Tucker’s version is fantastic. She has always had an awesome gritty southern voice, and her storytelling is legendary. Tucker did well through the 70’s and 80’s, and she is a 10-time Grammy winner. But the country scene started leaving her behind already when she adopted a much more country rock sound in 1978.

For the last few decades her star has faded quite a bit. People wonder who she is. Is she still alive or what?

Shockingly, this could well be the best music of her career. And she’s over 60 and has been singing for 40 years. This is odd as rock musicians tend to peak quite early, in the late teens to 20’s. They make great music for 10 years or so, typically burning out by 35-40 just when novelists hit their peak (Gravity’s Rainbow, Ulysses and Moby Dick were all written between ages 32-40).

In this sense, rock musicians are like classical music prodigies, who also peak young and mathematicians, who of course peak young. Perhaps music and math genius are down to fluid IQ, which is frankly a measure of pure brain speed. Fluid IQ peaks at age 23, which is just coincidentally when we have the maximum number of brain cells.

Not that IQ tests measure intelligence or anything like that. It’s mere coincidence that IQ peaks at the very same time we have the most brain cells!

So a singer-songwriter making her best album at age 60 after a 40 year career is a pretty amazing thing.

She lived quite the hard life when young. As a teenager, she was a chart-topper and award-winner who ended up going broke eight years later and moving back in with her parents. She had a wild one year affair with Glen Campbell of Rhinestone Cowboy fame, a tabloid year full of drinking, cocaine and crazy spats.

During the 80’s, Tanya had a blast. She drank like a fish and sniffed up half of Peru. She bragged that she would out-party any man. By 1988, it was all over and she was checking into the Betty Ford Clinic. That’s probably the only reason she’s still alive.

This song harkens back to the time around when she was checking into the Ford Clinic only two years after her chart-topping Girls Like Me album. She was at the top charts of music and at the bottom of the wells of addiction, both at the same time.

The highest of highs and the lowest of lows, dancing off together, gripped sickly tight in hate and love and life and death, across the stage of the fame as it all crashed down around her to the roars of adoring crowds as she fell down drunk in the aisles.

We’re waiting for you, on the edges of our chairs, ears tilted to the anxious sky.

Come on. Come on back home again.

Welcome back, Tanya.

Happy 50th Birthday, Woodstock

Canned Heat, Up the Country. Footage from Woodstock.

Wish I could have been there, but I was only 11 years old at the time and I totally hated hippies.

I wish I could say I remembered Woodstock, but I can’t say I really did. Had I been older I probably would have gone there.

By the way, this is really good music. Canned Heat from 1969. Yes, they played at Woodstock. Don’t eat the brown acid!

Guess who the woman in the blue dress is walking to the tent from the beginning until :38. Sure sure looks happy, doesn’t she?

That’s Janis Joplin!

Canned Heat, Up the Country was actually released in 1968. It was performed at Woodstock in 1969.

“‘Cause you got a home as long as I’ve got mine.” Hey, I really like that line. Something special about it.

I’m goin’ up the country, baby don’t you want to go?
I’m goin’ up the country, baby don’t you want to go?
I’m goin’ to some place where I’ve never been before
I’m goin’ I’m goin’ where the water tastes like wine
I’m goin’ where the water tastes like wine
We can jump in the water, stay drunk all the time
I’m gonna leave this city, got to get away
I’m gonna leave this city, got to get away
All this fussin’ and fightin’ man you know I sure can’t stay
So baby pack your leavin’ trunk, you know we’ve got to leave today
Just exactly where we’re goin’ I cannot say
But we might even leave the U.S.A.
It’s a brand new game that I want to play
No use in your runnin’ or screamin’ and cryin’
‘Cause you got a home as long as I’ve got mine

Happy 50th Birthday Give Peace a Chance

The official video from the song, no less. Recorded in Montreal, Canada in Room 1742 at the Queen Elizabeth Hotel in June 1969 with John and Yoko singing backed by the Plastic Ono Band. The song was released while John was still part of the Beatles.

The other Beatles hated that John was with Yoko. “That Okinawan witch,” Paul McCarthy referred to her. Yoko was a very avant-garde artist from Japan who speak English as a second language. The two were very much in love, though John used to beat her up in the 1970’s when they lived in New York.

One of the greatest antiwar songs of all time. From the anti-Vietnam War Movement of that time. I am wondering. Will we ever have another antiwar movement ever again in this blighted land? I think it will never happen again. Just one more way we have gone backwards in fifty years.

At 1:38, 2:05,3:38, and again at 4:50, guess who that is? None other than Timothy Leary himself! Every time I see Tim Leary,  he’s always got an ear to ear smile across his face.

I saw him once in a video store on Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood in 1985. He was renting a copy of Amadeus at 10 PM. My friend said, “Bob! Look! It’s Timothy Leary! The Godhead! And he put his hands together and prayer and started bowing to the Prince of LSD. He was smiling then too, same thing. His teeth lit up the room, and you couldn’t frown if you tried. I guess if you took as much acid as he did, you might have a perma-smile on your face too, right?

Who’s that at 1:52? Allen Ginsberg? Gotta be him. It can’t be anyone else.

Who’s that at 2:48? It’s got to be Tommy Smothers!

And the gorgeous Rosemary Woodruff Leary from the start off and on until :46 and then again in several places. Got to be her. Plus she’s sitting right next to Tim.

Derek Taylor at 1:22. The famous record producer and journalist known as “The Fifth Beatle.”

Tommy Cooper, the comedian and magician, in the background at 1:07 and again at 3:06? Could well be.

Now we have to find Dylan and Mailer, and we’re home free.

They don’t mention her in the song, but can anyone spot the woman at 4:02. I can. It’s Petula Clark, the famous actress!

Ev’rybody’s talking about
Bagism, Shagism, Dragism, Madism, Ragism, Tagism
This-ism, that-ism, is-m, is-m, is-m
All we are saying is give peace a chance
All we are saying is give peace a chance
C’mon
Ev’rybody’s talking about
Ministers, sinisters, banisters and canisters
Bishops and fishops and rabbis and Popeyes
And bye bye, bye byes
All we are saying is give peace a chance
All we are saying is give peace a chance
Let me tell you now
Ev’rybody’s talking about
Revolution, evolution, masturbation
Flagellation, regulation, integrations
Meditations, United Nations
Congratulations
All we are saying is give peace a chance
All we are saying is give peace a chance
Ev’rybody’s talking about
John and Yoko, Timmy Leary, Rosemary Tommy Smothers, Bobby Dylan
Tommy Cooper, Derek Taylor
Norman Mailer, Alan Ginsberg
Hare Krishna
Hare, Hare Krishna
All we are saying is give peace a chance
All we are saying is give peace a chance
All we are saying is give peace a chance
All we are saying is give peace a chance

Happy 50th Birthday Midnight Cowboy

Midnight Cowboy starring Jon Voight (possibly the best of his career) and Dustin Hoffman in two of their finest roles ever. Released in 1969 to rave reviews.

One of the greatest movies of all time. Very popular with hipsters. I first heard of it from some of the local street guys, macho punk hustler pot and acidhead types, the first time I ever smoked pot, in 1973. It was a traumatic situation that I will not go into.

But I do remember one of those macho punk hustler delinquents told the other one that Midnight Cowboy was on the TV and to come inside and watch it. That’s what it was. A cult hipster hippie movie from the 1960’s with its own special unique charm. The movie had a bit of homosexuality in it, but that wasn’t enough to scare of these tough street punks.

If you have never watched this movie, you don’t know what you are missing.

And the final scene is sad as Hell. Really, the whole damn movie is sad as Hell, come to think of it.

Happy 50th Birthday Canned Heat, “On the Road Again”

Canned Heat, On the Road Again. From 1968! Pure hippie blues.

Well, I’m so tired of crying
But I’m out on the road again
I’m on the road again
Well, I’m so tired of crying
But I’m out on the road again
I’m on the road again

I ain’t got no woman
Just to call my special friend

You know the first time I traveled
Out in the rain and snow
In the rain and snow
You know the first time I traveled
Out in the rain and snow
In the rain and snow

I didn’t have no payroll
Not even no place to go

And my dear mother left me
When I was quite young
When I was quite young
And my dear mother left me
When I was quite young
When I was quite young

She said, “Lord, have mercy
On my wicked son.”

Take a hint from me, mama
Please don’t you cry no more
Don’t you cry no more
Take a hint from me, mama
Please don’t you cry no more
Don’t you cry no more

‘Cause it’s soon one morning
Down the road I’m going

But I ain’t going down
That long old lonesome road
All by myself
But I ain’t going down
That long old lonesome road
All by myself

I can’t carry you, baby
Gonna carry somebody else

1968-1970: A Remembrance of Things Past

At age 11 years old in late 1968 to late 1969, I was a hippie-hater. My parents of course encouraged this pro-Establishment nonsense, being Greatest Generation squares and all.

Around this time, we started playing a game called, “Boy or a Girl?” every time we saw a boy with long hair, who were starting to get more common at that time. I’m not sure who started the game, my parents or my brothers and I (they were 8 and 5), but our parents sure egged us and on and played along with relish. Little did I realize that in a few short years I would be growing my hair out like a girl myself and a year later turning into a bit of a hippie myself.

My father was a good Cold War liberal of the Bernie Sanders type except that he despised the counterculture, especially “Chaar-lie Manson” and “Aaay-bie Hoffman,” the latter of whose disrespectful performance in the courtroom outraged my staid father. That was the hippie movement for my father. Charles Manson and Abbie Hoffman. That was it.

Yes, I grew up with the Manson Murders, the Watts riots, the RFK assassination, the Chicago Convention in 1968, the whole nine yards. In 1968, I walked the streets for “Clean Gene” McCarthy, the antiwar candidate, with my father, who had turned against the war after the Tet Offensive.

I was a bit of a Vietnam War fan, and every day, they would list the battles that took place the day before and how many were killed and wounded in them. American soldiers were getting killed and wounded every single day in significant numbers. I had a really cool map of Vietnam, and I would go look up the battles on my map.

And of course I remember the Mi Lai Massacre. A lot of people were defending Calley and the rest because they said US troops had taken many casualties in that area recently, and even the women and the kids were serving as guerrillas, setting up booby-traps for instance. I’m not sure how true that was, but I doubt if it justifies slaughtering civilians like that.

One week Time Magazine printed the photos and biographies of all the men who had died in Nam that previous week. We were losing ~200 men a week in one of those years, I forget which. There were maybe 200 of them! I remember that really brought the war home.

People heard the numbers of killed and wounded every week or so, but it never really sunk in. When they saw the 200 faces of those very young men in that magazine who had been in only a single week, it really hit home in Middle America in a personal way.

I watched Walter Cronkite all the time, and I remember when he, to everyone’s shock, turned against the war. The turning point for him as for everyone else was the Tet Offensive.

I was a wild LA Dodgers fan, and we went to a lot of games. Don Drysdale was a great pitcher who set some records back then. Sandy Koufax was another great Dodgers pitcher. Willie Mays of the San Fransisco A’s was at the peak of his game. Mickey Mantle was still around.

We also went to LA Rams and even USC Trojans games. We got to meet some of the Rams at some signature gathering meeting at a local Sears outlet. I met OJ Simpson at a game in Candlestick Park in San Francisco once and got his autograph. He had a permanent smile a yard wide. The charm radiated off of him in waves. There was no way to not like him if you still had a real beating warm-blooded heart.

The grass is always greener on the other side of the street, and the old days were always better than today. If we’ve lived a decent and relatively happy life, one thing we can all say is that we all had a once upon a time.

Elton John, Curtains, from Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy. Yes, I bought that album in 1975. One of the greatest rock albums ever made.

I used to know this old scarecrow
He was my song
My joy and sorrow
Cast alone between the furrows
Of a field
No longer sown by anyone

I held a dandelion
That said the time had come
To leave upon the wind
Not to return
When summer burned the earth again

Oh
Oh
Cultivate the freshest flower
This garden ever grew
Beneath these branches I once wrote
Such childish words for you
But that’s okay
There’s treasure children always seek to find
And just like us
You must have had
A once a upon a time
Oh
Oh
Oh
Oh
Oh
Oh
Oh
Oh
Oh
Oh (lovely-lovely)
Oh (lovely-lovely)
Oh (lovely-lovely)
Oh (lovely-lovely)
Oh (lovely-lovely)
Oh (lovely-lovely)
Oh (lovely-lovely)
Oh (lovely-lovely)
Oh (lovely-lovely)
Oh (lovely-lovely)
Oh (lovely-lovely)
Oh (lovely-lovely)
Oh (lovely-lovely)
Oh (lovely-lovely)
Oh (lovely-lovely)
Oh (lovely-lovely)
Oh (lovely-lovely)
Oh (lovely-lovely)

Happy Fiftieth Birthday, Easy Rider

Take the world in a love embrace!

I’ve always loved Steppenwolf. That’s one group of badass motherfuckers from the 1960’s. So was that movie too, by the way. One of the best hipster, outsider, hippie, and road movies ever  made. Basically giving the finger to the Establishment all the way, even at this late date, like all of us good rebels always should.

Full version here:

Lyrics:

Get your motor runnin’
Head out on the highway
Lookin’ for adventure
And whatever comes our way

Yeah darlin’ go make it happen
Take the world in a love embrace
Fire all of your guns at once
And explode into space

I like smoke and lightning
Heavy metal thunder
Racin’ with the wind
And the feelin’ that I’m under

Yeah darlin’ go make it happen
Take the world in a love embrace
Fire all of your guns at once
And explode into space

Like a true nature’s child
We were born, born to be wild
We can climb so high
I never wanna die

Born to be wild

Born to be wild

NB: I never knew what this song was all about. I thought it was just about being a bad boy, which is my lifetime vocation from age 16-on. The only reason I do this rebel crap is that women eat up. Plus I still hate authority. I’m still rebelling against my father, the cops, the school authorities, my bosses, and all the rest of the jerkoffs who tried so foolishly to control and tame me.

Leonard Cohen, “Everybody Knows”

Real nice! Great song for the end of the world. While the world burns a whirlwind all around you, this is your song. Party amidst the ruins.

Everybody knows that the dice are loaded
Everybody rolls with their fingers crossed
Everybody knows that the war is over
Everybody knows the good guys lost
Everybody knows the fight was fixed
The poor stay poor, the rich get rich
That’s how it goes
Everybody knows

Everybody knows that the boat is leaking
Everybody knows that the captain lied
Everybody got this broken feeling
Like their father or their dog just died

Everybody talking to their pockets
Everybody wants a box of chocolates
And a long stem rose
Everybody knows

Everybody knows that you love me baby
Everybody knows that you really do
Everybody knows that you’ve been faithful
Ah give or take a night or two
Everybody knows you’ve been discreet
But there were so many people you just had to meet
Without your clothes
And everybody knows

Everybody knows, everybody knows
That’s how it goes
Everybody knows

Everybody knows, everybody knows
That’s how it goes
Everybody knows

And everybody knows that it’s now or never
Everybody knows that it’s me or you
And everybody knows that you live forever
Ah when you’ve done a line or two
Everybody knows the deal is rotten
Old Black Joe’s still pickin’ cotton
For your ribbons and bows
And everybody knows

And everybody knows that the Plague is coming
Everybody knows that it’s moving fast
Everybody knows that the naked man and woman
Are just a shining artifact of the past
Everybody knows the scene is dead
But there’s gonna be a meter on your bed
That will disclose
What everybody knows

And everybody knows that you’re in trouble
Everybody knows what you’ve been through
From the bloody cross on top of Calvary
To the beach of Malibu
Everybody knows it’s coming apart
Take one last look at this Sacred Heart
Before it blows
And everybody knows

Everybody knows, everybody knows
That’s how it goes
Everybody knows

Oh everybody knows, everybody knows
That’s how it goes
Everybody knows

Everybody knows

Alt Left: Anatomy of Two Chinese Stereotypes: Greediness and Lack of Aesthetic Taste

Thinking Mouse:

What do you make of the stereotype that Chinese are greedy amoral worker drones with no aesthetic taste and little emotion?

Lot of truth to those things. Let’s take these one by one here. We previously discussed amorality and stoicism or lack of emotion, so let us look at greediness and lack of aesthetic taste. I will also look at Jews as many Chinese stereotypes are Jewish stereotypes as well.

 

Greediness

 

The Chinese are white collar criminals, and they are amoral in that sense. Very similar to the Jews. It may be the case that any group with IQ’s markedly higher than the majority will not only grab most of the money under capitalism but will also be profoundly ruthless and amoral in how they go about it, often to the point of basically being a race of white collar criminals, which is what I would call Chinese and Jews.

Both Chinese and Jews are viewed as being fanatically money-oriented, materialistic, and aggressively driven to succeed at all costs. As the Jews have their Jewish mothers and uncles with pinky rings, so the Chinese have the newly created Tiger Moms

Lack of Aesthetic Taste

 

You can make the lack of aesthetic taste argument about all those other Chinese-influenced societies. The Chinese or Japanese artist is deliberately spare and seems at first glance to be drawing excessively, shall we say, modest paintings. It is as if the Asian artist feels ashamed of artistic talent and is deliberately dumbing down in his art so as to not appear better than others.

Nevertheless, artists have told me that Chinese and Japanese art is excellent in its own spare, somewhat minimalist, and certainly modest sense.

Both Chinese and Japanese have taken to modern literature, the Japanese in particular in terms of fiction. But both races have early traces of fiction in the form of epic tales that are basically novels extending back centuries, even to 1000. Think of The Tale of the Genji or Water Margin for Japanese and Chinese respectively.

Japanese invented a very interesting, spare, minimal, “shy”, and modest or self-effacing form of poetry called the haiku, which in its own way reaches to the peaks of literature.

The Japanese also took up Western or rock music. Many excellent rock bands of all sorts have come out of Japan. The Chinese, like the Italians, have been entertaining themselves via operas forever.

Music is bad compared to the late 90s or earlier.

Yep, no doubt about it!  Well, country/western isn’t so bad nowadays – but I cannot stand new music in more other genres.  What’s the reason?  Is it music downloads taking away the incentive to create?  Is it mixing of genres (ut oh — some racist connotations here!)   What’s the problem?

Well, I’d say it’s due to incentive – but this is a socialist blog, so I have to can that kind of talk.  Well, I don’t think musicians getting fair pay is anti-socialist – but just workers rights.

America's Ferociously Anti-Intellectual Culture Is Literally Idiocracy In Practice

Rahul: Robert, Feynman didn’t win the Nobel Prize in Physics because he had a 190 Physics IQ or because he had a 125 IQ. He won it because he was ardently passionate about Physics and Math, and he contributed enough to the betterment of using Physics to serve humanity. That’s why he won the Prize.
I don’t mean to be rude when I say this Robert (hell, this is the case with pretty much any disagreement I have, which is a lot), but this comment was somewhat insulting to Richard Feynman. Really, you’re attributing it to his 190 Physics IQ (which I doubt)?

He was passionate about it and he contributed to using physics to better humanity because he had one of the most brilliant physics minds ever recorded. It’s not insulting to say Feynman had a 190 IQ in Physics. In fact, I bet if I knew him and I said that to him, he would probably laugh and say I was right. The 190 physics IQ is literally proven by having some of the highest physics scores ever recorded on various tests. If you go around the Net, everywhere they talk about Feynman’s IQ, they say just this. No one anywhere says he did it by trying really hard.
You do not get one of the highest Physics scores ever recorded on a widely given test by trying really hard. Fuck that. You get that by being one of the smartest and highest Physics IQ men in history in Physics.
Why are you such an IQ denier? Have you lived in America your whole life?
Because in this idiot, insane culture, the line is, “Anyone can do anything” and “Intelligence doesn’t matter.” And in America, there is a complete denial of intelligence itself. This is shown by contempt for the very concept. In America, “anyone can do anything they want if they give it enough effort” and often you cannot even acknowledge that human beings differ in intelligence at all or that this matters in any way.
I talk like this a lot because intelligence is interesting to me, and I get very politely shut down (they simply disagree with me very politely, mostly by dismissing my argument with a smile) all time.
This Idiocracy culture is so infuriating. We acknowledge frankly intellectual gifts in a whole range of things, even athletics, where “physical intelligence” forms a large part of “athletic genius.” Haven’t you heard athletes who say things like, “Baseball is 90% mental.”? However, your average American usually insists that great athletes simply tried real hard.
We often speak of artistic and musical genius and the implication is that it was inborn, though you often run into resistance to that with countless Americans implying that musical and artistic geniuses simply “tried really hard.” 
Americans simply refuse to believe in the concept of inborn intelligence or intellectual strengths in any way, and that is when they acknowledge that intelligence itself even exists at all.
Many, perhaps most Americans simply insist that “there is no such thing as intelligence,” which is a stunning statement for a human being to utter. Most infuriating of all is that the smartest people are the worst intelligence deniers. Even more infuriating is that the more leftwing people get, they more openly hostile they are to the very concept of intelligence, especially if it is inborn. All I have to say is that an American Left culture that has extreme hatred for the very notion that intelligence exists at all is not one I want to be a part of. It doesn’t sound like one that’s going to be very successful either, or if it is successful, I fear for the country that ends up being run by these overeducated fools.
You start getting down below 100 or especially 90 IQ, they generally agree that some humans are definitely way smarter than other humans. At that level, people are often awestruck by very smart people.
That’s if they are not too stupid. Truly stupid people around 80 IQ often can’t even seem to grasp the concept of intelligence at all or refuse to see how it could be important in any way. This is because they are literally too stupid to even recognize intelligence for what it is.
Further, if you start talking about intelligence even related to jobs in the US, you get shut down almost immediately with, “Oh no, you don’t have to be smart to do that. Anyone can do that.” You even get shut down if you imply that some people are smarter than other people.
Sometimes I talk about how I can tell someone is smart by simply looking at their faces while I interact with them. I usually get completely dismissed when I say that. I can tell how smart someone is by looking into their eyes, listening to how they talk (for instance, speed, comprehension, response speed), and mostly looking for, more than anything else, simply speed of response. Smart people are simply faster than other human beings. And it correlates directly with IQ.
I had a girlfriend with a 140 IQ once, and she was one of the fastest women I have ever known. She got my jokes, bam, immediately, as soon as they hit her brain just like that. And she had a sharp response to the joke almost instantly. She was so fast it almost seemed like she started laughing before the joke was even over. I had another girlfriend with a ~115 IQ, and while she was definitely intelligent, there’s no way on Earth she was that lightning fast.
And I met a woman with an IQ of 156 once who was literally the fastest woman I have ever met in my life. She was faster than the 140 woman, knew more stuff, and picked up completely new topics she knew nothing about very quickly. She would ask me, “What is that?” about some concept that she had no idea what it was. I would start to explain it, and it never took more than 3-5 minutes before she had gobbled up the whole concept and had gotten the gist of it like an expert. I have never met a woman who understood brand new things with so little explanation.
She might even have been faster than I am. Her IQ was ~10 points higher. I didn’t feel outclassed at all though. We were basically on the same level. But I had definitely met my match. She was a real challenge to talk to, but I love challenges.

How IQ Limits You in School and Life

Rahul: Robert, there are professors with IQ’s in the 90’s out there. There are scientists too, and many other professions.
You are being very IQ deterministic. IQ does carry some merit, but it’s not the only thing. Also, intelligence can span from many different things. Intelligence is the ability to learn. People with Low IQ’s are very street smart, more so than high IQ folks. Musical intelligence exists too, many low IQ blacks are excellent rappers. Mechanical intelligence, not every high IQ fella can fix shit with their hands.
There’s this article on Grey Enlightenment on illusory superiority. It’s a phenomenal article.
Also, you can increase your IQ, it’s not fixed at all. Just because most people don’t increase it doesn’t mean that it’s impossible. Some people get pretty big gains too.
For a degree, you only need an average IQ.
For a masters too, only an average.
Even for a PhD, you only need average.
Hell, for the Nobel, you probably don’t need a monstrously high IQ either.

There are almost zero university professors with IQ’s in the 90’s. I dare you to show me one university professor with an IQ at that level. With an IQ in the 90’s, you will have a difficult time getting a BA, for Chrissake.
Show me one “scientist” anywhere with an IQ in the 90’s. One.
You don’t realize that IQ is intelligence. By attacking IQ, you attack the very concept of human intelligence itself.
Street smarts, musical and mechanical knowledge alone won’t get you through university or a job as a professor or scientist. As an aside, most very good musicians are quite intelligent. We think Blacks are stupid, but I have read interviews with great Black blues musicians who no one would ever think would be smart, and I was shocked at how smart they were. I read an interview with Miles Davis, and it almost knocked me on the floor. He’s at least as smart as I am.
I am always shocked at how smart auto mechanics are. They’re not book smart intellectuals, but I haven’t met a stupid mechanic yet, and I’ve met more than I can count. We think they are just stupid grease monkeys, and they don’t act all that smart, but those guys are wicked smart. I saw a chart once and I was shocked at how many auto mechanics had IQ’s of over 130. That will literally put you in the gifted program at school.
I met a man the other day whose job was fixing the slot machines in gambling houses. I was stunned at how smart he was. I could tell he was smart very fast just by looking at his eyes, listening to his speech and just seeing how sheer fast he was.
After age 18, IQ doesn’t go up much at all. Nor does it lower much either. IQ is even preserved in alcoholism, believe it or not. It can damage your brain, but IQ is typically preserved somehow.
Show me one person who got an over 15 IQ gain in adulthood. I would even like to see someone who got 15 points. I’ve heard it’s possible, but I’ve never known anyone who did that.
An average IQ of 100 will not get you a BA. You will struggle a lot, and you will simply not be able to understand a lot of the material. Many 100 IQ people will drop out of the university. You need a minimum 105 IQ to get a BA. You need a 110 IQ to get one relatively easily.
I definitely don’t see how you easily get an MA with an average IQ. I have known people who seemed to do it, but they were schoolteachers getting more or less bullshit Education MA’s, the easiest MA’s out there. And this woman that I knew had to have her attorney mother write most of her papers for her, otherwise she would never have passed.
I was in a Master’s program and there didn’t seem to be a lot of average IQ folks in there. Some of them were smarter than I was, or at least they were better at the material. For a Master’s, you will ever struggle at a 105-107 IQ. You won’t understand a lot of the material, and you will have a high likelihood of dropout, assuming you can even get in anyway, as you have to pass the GRE, and it is hard to pass the GRE with average intelligence. I would want a 115 IQ to get a Master’s degree, and even then it will be hard.
You need a minimum 115 IQ to get a PhD, and even then, you will not understand a lot of the material and you will have a high tendency to flunk out. You want a 125 IQ to get a PhD. If you have an IQ below 115, in all likelihood you will simply not be able to get a PhD unless you have an extremely lopsided IQ.
Most Nobel Prize winners have IQ’s of over 145. They’ve been studied.

Sewer, "2154"


Supposedly this is the most pure evil and Satanic music being made today. Well they have a lot of competition. It is described as Blackened Metal Terror Goregrind. This album is called “the most haunting Terrorgore album in existence.”
Blackened Metal is absolutely a subgroup of Black Metal, which itself is quite evil and Satanic. In fact, Satanic is the very definition of Black Metal. Goregrind is also a genre of metal. This is hardcore heavy metal grind music set to gory themes. Never heard of Terror Goregrind or Terrorgore before.
This band claims to be part of a subgenre called Sewer Metal, which is supposedly the most evil Black Metal of all.
A number of Black Metal bands have come out and stated that they are racists, particularly White Supremacists. The band that nearly started the trend is a band out of Norway, a member of which blew his brains out with a shotgun. Another band member supposedly came to the crime scene and ate some of his brains. There was also a homicide associated with this band. There have been a number of other deaths associated with the genre, mostly suicides but a few homicides. Quite a few band members are described as deeply, nihilistically depressed. The music is very angry, and anger + suidicality is a very bad thing.
I don’t think too much of true evil or Satanists, but I very much enjoy this music. As an added bonus, these guys can really play. That guitarist is too much.

Can You Be Androgynous yet Be Heterosexual/Straight?

Answered on Quora.
The best definition of an androgynous man is a man who has strong masculine and strong feminine characteristics going at the same time. Remember glam rock back in the 1970’s? Many of those male rockers were quite androgynous, and most of them were very heterosexual or at least leaned straight.
Another definition of androgynous means a man who looks and acts so much like a woman that you can’t tell if he is a man or a woman. Or the opposite in a woman. Almost all if not all such cases of extremely feminine men who appear to be women and extremely masculine women who seem to be men that I have studied are in fact homosexuals. In fact they are very gay.
Now if you include men like Prince as androgynes, there are indeed some straight men like this, as Prince was completely heterosexual.
Honestly we straight men had a lot more leeway in terms of true androgyny back in the 70’s. A straight man could wear scarves, velvet pants, silk shirts, short kimonos, smoking jackets, tight jeans, dancing shoes, and four inch blue platform heels without most people suggesting you were gay. People would just say you were “styling it.” You can act a lot softer, gentler, or more androgynous. You could have a strong feminine side, especially if you matched it with a strong masculine side.
Back then, people were assumed straight until proven otherwise, and there were not many out gays anyways. Accusing a man of being gay was a very serious matter, as this was seen as a horrible insult if he was straight. So most men were simply assumed, correctly, to be straight until proven otherwise. If you wanted to accuse a man of being gay, you had better have had some pretty damn good evidence to back it up.
I am actually nostalgic for those days. I had so much more freedom back then in terms of both clothing and behavior.
Now that gays are so out, we straight men can no longer wear those wild clothes I talked about above nor can we act the way I did back then. If I tried to wear any of that stuff now that I wore back then, people would automatically assume that I was gay or bi. If I told them I was straight, no one would believe me, and they would all accuse me of lying. Compared to back then, acceptable behavior and garb for straight men has become dramatically restricted.
It’s not been a positive change. We have gone backwards in a huge way.

"From the Mississippi Delta to South Australia," by Alpha Unit

Don Morrison salvages old galvanized sheet metal from sheds and farms throughout Australia. The older the metal, the better, he says; some of this reclaimed metal is over 100 years old. He takes it to his workshop in Summertown, South Australia, where he fashions it into metal-bodied acoustic guitars. Of his material he says:

Galvanised iron, or Galvo, is now an integral part of the Australian landscape and it seemed natural (to me at least!) to try it in a resonator guitar. The result is a truly awesome sound, very loud but with a surprisingly rounded tone. I should call it the Transcontinental guitar – genuine Aussie material, genuine Delta sound!

That “Delta sound” refers to Delta blues, one of the early forms of blues. This music arose in the Mississippi Delta, which, despite its name, is not a part of the actual delta of the Mississippi River. Rather, it is located in the northwestern part of Mississippi, bounded by the Mississippi River on the west and the Yazoo River on the east.

This alluvial floodplain is one of the most fertile agricultural regions in the world. It was here that Black field hands created the music we call blues, using chants, “field hollers,” and songs to make their work go faster. Ed Kopp writes:

While blues lyrics often deal with personal adversity, the music itself goes far beyond self-pity. The blues is also about overcoming hard luck, saying what you feel, ridding yourself of frustration, letting your hair down, and simply having fun.
The best blues is visceral, cathartic, and starkly emotional. From unbridled joy to deep sadness, no form of music communicates more genuine emotion.

Although the sound of a resonator guitar is iconic to blues, blues musicians didn’t start out playing the resonator. The earliest bluesmen played an instrument called the diddley bow.
The diddley bow has been called “the godfather of American roots instruments.” It is the simplest form of the guitar and is the first type of slide guitar used in America. It was very easy to make, consisting of a string of wire tensioned between two nails on a board. A bottle or can wedged under the wire would create tension for pitch. The player would pluck the string while sliding a piece of metal or glass on it to produce notes.

One-stringed bow instruments date back to antiquity and developed in various parts of East Asia and in the west coast and Congo regions of Africa. Rural Black Southerners crafted these instruments and taught their children to play them. They would sometimes build one-stringed zithers on a wall, “with a strand of baling wire, two thread spools for bridges, and a half-pint whiskey bottle for a slider,” as slide guitar player Big Joe Williams recalled to one researcher.

Boys who showed promise on the diddley bow could graduate to a guitar if they were lucky enough to get a hold of one. Musicians such as Lightnin’ Hopkins, Elmore James, and B. B. King all first learned to play on the diddley bow.

Once musicians could afford guitars they quickly abandoned the diddley bow. And when the resonator guitar came along, they had a way to present their music to even larger audiences. The resonator, with its crisp metallic ring, created the signature sound of Delta blues. When you listen to Charley Patton, Robert Johnson, Son House, or Bukka White – among many others – you’re listening to Delta blues. Others, such as John Lee Hooker and Muddy Waters, started out playing Delta blues.

This Delta sound is what craftsmen like Don Morrison aim to re-create. His resonators, like the very first of their kind, have built-in amplification – a feature that came about by demand.

Back in the early 1920s guitar players performing with dance orchestras couldn’t really stand out from the other players. Since there were no amplifiers, guitars were considered a part of the rhythm section instead of lead instruments. A vaudeville performer and promoter named George Beauchamp wanted an acoustic guitar that could play melodies over the orchestral instruments. He turned to John Dopyera, a violin repairman and luthier whose workshop was close to Beauchamp’s Los Angeles home.

John Dopyera and his brother Rudy experimented with various designs to achieve a smooth and balanced amplified sound and decided to mount cone-like aluminum resonators, similar to speaker cones, inside a metal guitar body. Dopyera found that using three smaller cones instead of one big cone gave the guitar the sound he’d been looking for. The tri-cone resonator guitar was born.

Beauchamp was impressed with the new design and proposed a business venture to Dopyera, who agreed. They created the National String Instrument Corporation in 1927. National guitars quickly became best sellers. The company soon created a wood-bodied model.

There were differences, though, between Beauchamp and Dopyera. Beauchamp preferred a single-cone resonator, not only because it was louder but because it was cheaper to make. For Dopyera, excellent sound and quality were top priorities. The two men finally went their separate ways when Dopyera found out that Beauchamp had claimed the patent for the single-cone resonator. In 1928 Dopyera quit National, with the intention of manufacturing his own single-cone resonator. John and his brother Emil formed the Dobro Manufacturing Company (named for the Dopyera Brothers).

Because National held the patent for his single-cone resonator, John Dopyera had to develop a new style of single-cone resonator. The single biggest change that he made was to the bridge of the guitar.

On a standard acoustic guitar, the bridge is glued directly to the top of the guitar. It has several functions: it holds the strings securely, sets the spacing of the strings, and acts as an external brace to the guitar body. Its other important job is transferring vibrations from the strings to the soundboard of the guitar. On a resonator guitar, the bridge is a part of the resonator cone.
For single-cone resonators, the cone has either a “biscuit” bridge or a “spider” bridge.
The National resonator used a biscuit cone, which is convex (pointing outward). Inside the tip of the cone sits a round wooden bridge (the biscuit), and set into the bridge is a small piece typically found on a guitar bridge – the saddle. The saddle keeps the strings elevated at the preferred height above the fretboard. The saddle transfers the string vibrations to the bridge and the bridge transfers them to the cone. The cone in turn vibrates, moving the air volume inside the guitar out through the sound holes.

For his Dobro resonator, John Dopyera decided to make his cone concave (pointing inward) and used an eight-legged “spider” bridge which straddled the cone. The vibrations from the strings travel from the saddle and down the spider “legs,” providing the cone with eight contact rods for vibration. The result is a loud, full-bodied tone.

Resonator guitars became popular in both blues and bluegrass. Dobro-style guitars, especially wood-bodied ones, were preferred by many bluegrass players. Blues players tended toward National-style tri-cone resonators. But plenty of guitarists break with tradition and use resonators in their own preferred ways.

Players liked resonators because, being louder than regular acoustic guitars, they could play for larger crowds in rural areas that didn’t have electricity for amplifiers. Street musicians, who had to set up without amplifiers, liked resonator guitars for the same reason.

Don Morrison makes both single-cone and tri-cone resonators. For his popular Rustbucket model, he says he flattens the corrugated steel sheets by walking on them so he can fit them through his ancient set of sheet metal rollers. Some of this old metal will still bear the makers’ stamps: Trademark Redcliffe, for example, or Lysaght Queen’s Head Australia or Emu Best. You’ll see these stamps on the backs of his guitars.

On some Rustbuckets he takes naturally weathered Galvo and adds an artificially rusted cone and sound holes, giving the guitar a distinctive, vintage look.

When he isn’t building resonators, Don Morrison is performing music, often Delta blues. During the ’90s his band, The Elmores, played blues classics by Elmore James and John Lee Hooker. He and his band Prawnhead are also a part of a “roots revolution” in popular music.

We honed our style on the streets and markets of Adelaide. We found the faster we played, the more money we made. We don’t play blues or folk, we don’t play country, we don’t play bluegrass, nor do we play rockabilly. But we play a mixture of all of those. We call it bluebilly.

Image courtesy of Slide Guitar for Beginners

Is Paul Stanley Gay or Bisexual?

Answered on Quora (Stanley is the lead singer of KISS):
Thank you! That’s an excellent question. I have studied this question for an article I wrote about gay and bisexual rock stars.
Paul Stanley is one of the most legendary womanizers in all of rock and roll. He has probably had sex with hundreds of women. No gay man does that, nor has any gay man ever done that. Any man who does that cannot possibly be gay, and he almost always leans straight. These men are frankly the most heterosexual men of us all.
Some people have said that he is effeminate, and he does have some effeminate behaviors. At least one groupie said his effeminacy creeped her out – she didn’t like it. I do not think Stanley is strongly effeminate, but he has a few behaviors like that, in particular the way he holds his hands when he sits.
Despite his reputation as a womanizer, he has long been rumored to be bisexual. Groupie boards report that he is bisexual. Ace Frehley and Ace’s wife have both stated that Stanley is bisexual. I think he is much less interested in men than he is in women. We can see this by his legendary womanizing. That is an indication of how he leans sexually. Paul Stanley is a predominantly straight man with some minor bisexual leanings in my opinion.
He is now married with children for some years.

Joni Mitchell, "Big Yellow Taxi"


A great environmentalist song from long ago, in 1970! That’s almost 50 years ago! This was off of her third album, Ladies of the Canyon, a reference to Laurel Canyon in Los Angeles where many hippies took up residence back then. There’s no way they could afford to live there now – it’s far too expensive. I have been through Laurel Canyon before, and it’s a beautiful drive. This was Joni’s third album and it is widely praised. Joni is originally Canadian, believe it or not. But by age 22, she was living in the US in Detroit, and by age 25, she was in Los Angeles. This song was covered by several other groups, most famously by Counting Crows, but I have heard that their version is not as good as this one.
I love Joni Mitchell, one of the great hippie folk-rock singers from the 1970’s. She was a genuine hippie. She lived in a large house on substantial acreage where she liked to wander about naked, smoke pot, and entertain various boyfriends.
And I would like to wish Joni Mitchell a happy 74th birthday. Yes, she is still with us. One more thing – she was always so beautiful. I have seen a photo of her at age 55, and she still looks fantastic. She was one of the greatest songwriters of our modern era.
Great epitaph for our planet with Donald Trump in the White House and Scott Pruitt as EPA head. Why do people who call themselves environmentalists vote Republican? How could they? Are there actually people who refer to themselves as environmentalists who nevertheless vote Republican? How can they justify it? Survey after survey shows majority support for all of our environmental laws, including the much-maligned Endangered Species Act. Yes, even the ESA has strong majority support. So majorities support environmentalism across the board, but a lot of them march off and vote Republican every year anyway. Go figure.

Van Morrison, "Brown-eyed Girl"


Truly one of the all-time rock and roll great songs. They don’t call him Van the Man for nothing. Astral Weeks, only his second album recorded in 1968, is out of this world. It’s a song cycle, a whole document in song with a beginning, middle and ending. One thing about great albums is that you will often find that every single song on the album is good. There will not even be one lousy song. This is true of Astral Weeks. Astral Weeks almost reminds me of very early Bowie when he was nearly a folkie. If you have never heard or God forbid heard of Van Morrison, you really need to check him out.
Moondance was also a very good album, I believe. Once again, not one bad song and the feeling of a seamless whole.
Brown-eyed Girl is one of his most famous songs. It was actually one of the first solo songs he wrote after he left Them, a great band in its own right. It appeared on the very first album, Blowin’ Your Mind, released in 1967. The song was recently inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Hey, where did we go?
Days when the rains came
Down in the hollow
Playing a new game
Laughing and a-running, hey, hey
Skipping and a-jumping
In the misty morning fog with
Our, our hearts a-thumping
And you, my brown-eyed girl
You, my brown-eyed girl
Whatever happened
To Tuesday and so slow?
Going down to the old mine with a
Transistor radio
Standing in the sunlight laughing
Hide behind a rainbow’s wall
Slipping and a-sliding
All along the waterfall
With you, my brown-eyed girl
You, my brown-eyed girl
Do you remember when we used to sing
Sha la la la la la la la la la la dee dah?
Just like that
Sha la la la la la la la la la la dee dah
La dee dah
So hard to find my way
Now that I’m all on my own
I saw you just the other day
My, how you have grown!
Cast my memory back there, Lord
Sometime I’m overcome thinking about
Making love in the green grass
Behind the stadium
With you, my brown-eyed girl
You, my brown-eyed girl
Do you remember when we used to sing
Sha la la la la la la la la la la dee dah?
Laying in the green grass
Sha la la la la la la la la la la dee dah
Dee dah dee dah dee dah dee dah dee dah dee
Sha la la la la la la la la la la la la
Dee dah la dee dah la dee dah la
D-d-d-d-d-d-d-d-d-d