Most Human Experiences Are Neither Inherently Positive, Harmful, or Indifferent

Bottom line is this. Most behavior is neither inherently helpful, harmful, or indifferent. In general, it usually depends on the context that society attaches to the behaviors.

For many of these acts, if society tells you it’s harmless, no one gets harmed.

On the other hand, if another society tells people that the exact same behavior is terribly harmful, you usually end up with a lot of damaged people, with the damage often persisting for up to a decade or even decades or lifelong.

In other words, a lot of so-called inherently harmful and traumatic behaviors are only harmful because we scream that they have been harmed and had their lives ruined by this horrible crime committed upon them. This causes the “victims” to internalize the message that they got harmed, which results in them in effect harming themselves.

In other words, they get screwed up because we make a big deal out of it instead of blowing it off and telling the person to forget about it and move on. See the book, The Trauma Myth and the widely-condemned Bruce Ritter et al 1999 meta-analysis of studies on this issue published in a prestigious psychological journal, the conclusion of which has now been replicated a number of times since, for more.

I gather you can figure out what I am talking about here.

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