The Anchor Baby Madness and a Possible Way Out

They are everywhere in my town. Who? The anchor babies. Though it is difficult to generalize, typically when you see an Hispanic parent who cannot speak English with young children in tow who speak excellent English, as a good rule, you are dealing with an illegal alien parent and anchor baby kids.
The anchor babies idiotically get US citizenship, even though their parents stay illegal, due to what I feel is a misinterpretation of the 14th Amendment passed in 1868 meant to give citizenship to freed slaves. To freed slaves, not to illegal aliens! Unfortunately, the US public is divided on this, with about 51% supporting anchor baby citizenship and 47% opposing it. Nevertheless, support for it is probably pretty weak among most folks.
The anchor baby mess has created the whole “Don’t break up the families!” game among the traitor illegal alien supporters. It’s true that it can break up a family, but only because the kids are legal while the parents are illegal. If we got rid of anchor baby insanity, all of the lot would be illegal and they could all go back to wherever.
It would not be so tragic because all Hispanic anchor baby kids speak excellent Spanish in addition to perfect English. They are very competent bilinguals.
The anchor baby idiocy has gotten so crazy that pregnant Mexican women deliberately cross the border as tourists late in their pregnancy to give birth in a US hospital to get US citizenship for the kid. US border hospitals do a brisk business in this sort of thing.
There are many flights out of Korea in which female Korean citizens, late in their pregnancies, fly to Guam or the US to give birth to their kid so he can have Korean-US dual citizenship.
This blatant abuse of the system is offensive and insane and any sane society would have put an end to it long ago.
That we have not just means that we are no longer a mentally healthy society – we are a crazy society.
From a website, an analysis of the possible shaky grounds for the anchor babies lunacy, and the possibilities that it can be quickly overturned by the courts as a misinterpretation of the 14th Amendment. There has already been a pretty solid wall of case law built that would seem to build a foundation for overturning anchor baby stupidity.

(The 14 Amendment) grants citizenship at birth to just anyone who happens to be born within American jurisdiction. It is the allegiance (complete jurisdiction) of the child’s birth parents at the time of birth that determines the child’s citizenship–not geographical location.
If the United States does not have complete jurisdiction, for example, to compel a child’s parents to Jury Duty – then the U.S. does not have the total, complete jurisdiction demanded by the Fourteenth Amendment to make their child a citizen of the United States by birth.
The key to undoing the current misinterpretation of the Fourteenth Amendment is this odd phrase “and subject to the jurisdiction thereof.” The whole problem is caused by the fact that the meaning of this phrase, which was clear to anyone versed in legal language in 1868, has slipped with changes
in usage.
Fortunately, there is a large group of court precedents that make clear what the phrase actually means:
Case law building a foundation to overturn the anchor baby interpretation of the 14th Amendment:
The Fourteenth Amendment excludes the children of aliens. (The Slaughterhouse Cases (83 U.S. 36 (1873))
The Fourteenth Amendment draws a distinction between the children of aliens and children of citizens. (Minor v. Happersett (88 U.S. 162 (1874))
The phrase “subject to the jurisdiction” requires “direct and immediate allegiance” to the United States, not just physical presence. (Elk v. Wilkins 112 U.S. 94 (1884))
There is no automatic birthright citizenship in a particular case. (Wong Kim Ark Case, 169 U.S. 649 (1898))
The Supreme Court has never confirmed birthright citizenship for the children of illegal aliens, temporary workers, and tourists. (Plyler v. Doe, 457 U.S. 202, 211 n.10 (1982))
That the Fourteenth Amendment does not grant automatic birthright citizenship is also made clear by the fact that it took an act of Congress in 1922 to give American Indians birthright citizenship, which would obviously not have been necessary if they had it automatically just by being born here.
The facts are the facts. Congress needs to fix this mess that they created, the sooner the better for our country.”

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